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Endometriosis

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Endometriosis
Endometriosis - Symptoms and causes
By Research Staff
Endometriosis

The presence of tissue that normally grows inside the uterus (womb) in an abnormal anatomical location. Endometriosis is very common and may not produce symptoms, or it may lead to painful menstruation. It has also been associated with infertility. Endometriosis occurs most commonly within the Fallopian tubes and on the outside of the tubes and ovaries, the outer surface of the uterus and intestines, and anywhere on the surface of the pelvic cavity. It can also be found, less often, on the surface of the liver, in old surgery scars or, very rarely, in the lung or brain.

Endometriosis occurs in the reproductive years. The average age at diagnosis is 25-30.Endometriosis may be suspected by during a physical examination; it is confirmed by surgery, usually laparoscopy; available treatments include medication for pain, hormone therapy, and surgery.

Tiredness-- Tiredness or lack of energy, especially around the time of the period
Mood changes-- Anxiety and depression due to ongoing pain

Reduced quality of lifelife Taking days off work, study or school because of an inability to function normally
 Vagina
Pelvic floor muscle spasm or tightening occuring because of fear of pain previously experienced with intercourse or tampon use
Retrograde menstruation.
In retrograde menstruation, menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These displaced endometrial cells stick to the pelvic walls and surfaces of pelvic organs, where they grow and continue to thicken and bleed over the course of each menstrual cycle.
Transformation of peritoneal cells.
 In what's known as the "induction theory," experts propose that hormones or immune factors promote transformation of peritoneal cells — cells that line the inner side of your abdomen — into endometrial cells.
Embryonic cell transformation.
 Hormones such as estrogen may transform embryonic cells — cells in the earliest stages of development — into endometrial cell implants during puberty.
Surgical scar implantation.
After a surgery, such as a hysterectomy or C-section, endometrial cells may attach to a surgical incision.
Endometrial cells transport.
 The blood vessels or tissue fluid (lymphatic) system may transport endometrial cells to other parts of the body.
Immune system disorder.
 It's possible that a problem with the immune system may make the body unable to recognize and destroy endometrial tissue that's growing outside the uterus.
 https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3240
 https://jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/endometriosis/symptoms-causes
 https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/endometriosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20354656
Endometriosis

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